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    • matthewgallion
      • hello Matthew Gallion
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    • An Ode To Self-Importance and Pistachios.
      • In the early part of the twenty-first century, it was believed that the Internet had flattened the intellectual structures of the global society so that anyone with a computer could share their thoughts and opinions on any matter that came to mind. This is one such example of a blog that was irregularly maintained and decidedly typical. It's content ranged from meanderings about relationships to more substantial questions about the nature of God and the problems of politics. Its author, however, seemed to have lost interest in maintaining it at some point, as its once meaningful domain name expired. All who searched out this once completely average blog could only then find ads for pistachios.

        And that is how the Internet works.

      • answered by matthewgallion on 11/09/2012
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    • Good luck out there, Universe.
      • It's difficult to know what you will say about us in hindsight. I'm fairly certain that your historical analysis will ignore all the minutiae that I've obsessed over daily, tweeted about, and drank to forget. But if I had to try--was literally forced to encapsulate this entire year for all of time--I would say that this year has been about the questioning of the Absolute Individual. The Internet was kind of a big deal. We all had smart phones, Facebook defined our relationships for us ("Oh yeah. We're totally friends on the Face-Space.") Our e-ddiction was something of a paradox. We checked in on our social networks and ignored the person in the chair across the table. We preferred to text, where our every sentence was open to (mis-)interpretation. We were moving from communal religion to individual spirituality. We fought over a vitriolic political campaign between one candidate who fought for individual rights and limited government and another candidate who urged that everyone needed to do their "fair share" and work with the government to create a better future.

        Young people generally loved the Fair Share Barack Obama. Old, white people preferred Governor Mittens Romney. We fought about taxes and the deficit, healthcare and societal responsibility. Cable news networks, like Fox News and MSNBC, ramped up the vitriol with their--pardon my bias--fear mongering and elitism on both sides. I even heard a news story that people were deciding who to date primarily on their political views. In general, the popular narratives all seemed to suggest that we were on the brink of a socialist revolution or a total collapse of American society. It was, some said, the worst time in American history. (I sincerely doubt this at the time of this writing, but I suppose you'd know better than me at this point.)

        But for my friends and me, we just loved raw experience and relationships and self-expression and meaningfulness. We loved knowing one another and discovering ourselves. We loved trivia and movies and beer and music and laughter. We wanted to eat, to buy some cool shit, and to do something meaningful with our lives. But of course, we had absolutely no clue what that was.

        From where I sat, 2012 was about figuring out the relationship between community and the self at a time when all the lines between the two were blurred, subverted, or flat-out reversed. And I'm still working through it.

        I wonder if that's part of what makes us human. Or maybe you've figured it all out by now.

        Good luck out there, Universe.

      • answered by matthewgallion on 11/08/2012
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    • Bite your tongue!
      • the wide open spaces of an empty lot

        I hope that people never say that I'm broken. I hope that people never say that I'm needy. I hope that people never tell the truth.

        Because these are the hard realities of my existence these days. These are the things that haunt me. They are a clump of grass on an empty lot that I wrap my fingers into and pull, the dirt flying up as I rip the green from the earth.

        And I want to let go. So I hope that one day, people will tell the truth about how I used to be and will be proud of me for letting go and walking away from that empty lot.

      • answered by matthewgallion on 10/24/2012
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    • The scariest moment of my life.
      • Camp near Menzies, WA, Australia

        They all sat in the backyard. They'd been sitting around the fire for a few hours now, telling stories and enjoying s'mores. This was their campground for the night. Their faces flickered in the flames flying skyward from the little Smokey Joe in the middle. Dwight looked around at the people he loved. His wife, Jean, laughed long and loud. She always had, and that's one of the things he'd always loved about her. His beautiful daughter Hilary (whom this very narrator has a huge crush on) blew out a burning marshmallow and peeled off the burnt outer layer before setting it ablaze again. Her husband, Matt (the lucky bastard), struggled to pull stringy marshmallow leftovers out of his beard. Meghan and Matthew, two of Jean's family's cousins (although distantly and awkwardly related), sat somewhat silently but with huge ear-to-ear grins. Dwight noticed how late it was getting, but he suddenly felt inspired.

        "Before we climb into the tent for bed, everybody has to chug an Amp energy drink," Dwight said. His challenge was gladly accepted by Matt (the bearded fool of whom I harbor so much envy) and Matthew, the younger of the two cousins. The three boys chugged energy drinks and climbed into the tent. It had been a long day, and, energy drinks be damned, they were all very tired. Everyone slipped off to sleep without a moment's hesitation, thinking that perhaps Amp energy drinks weren't so potent after all.

        That is, until about 3:30 in the morning.

        "uuhhhhhHHAAAAAAAAAAAHHHARGH!" Everyone in the tent was violently awoken by a sudden scream.

        "What the hell was that?" Hilary asked, groggily.

        "I think it was your dad," cousin Matthew said.

        There was a moment of silence before Dwight said, "It's okay, everybody. Daddy just had a bad dream. Go back to sleep." More silence.

        Matt (the bearded one) lay on his back, shaking in fear. What could have possibly affected such a manly man so deeply? What could Dwight have to fear? And how was he supposed to sleep now? Sure, he hadn't the dream, which had obviously been terrifying for Dwight. But what's scarier? To have such a dream and to wake up? Or to be so violently awoken by the terror in someone else's voice?

        But who was Matt kidding? That was one of the most hilarious things he'd ever seen. What was really scary was thinking about what Dwight might do to him when he found out how much Matt liked to tell that story to everyone he knew.

      • answered by matthewgallion on 07/11/2010
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    • The scariest moment of my life.
      • Camp near Menzies, WA, Australia

        They all sat in the backyard. They'd been sitting around the fire for a few hours now, telling stories and enjoying s'mores. This was their campground for the night. Their faces flickered in the flames flying skyward from the little Smokey Joe in the middle. Dwight looked around at the people he loved. His wife, Jean, laughed long and loud. She always had, and that's one of the things he'd always loved about her. His beautiful daughter Hilary (whom this very narrator has a huge crush on) blew out a burning marshmallow and peeled off the burnt outer layer before setting it ablaze again. Her husband, Matt (the lucky bastard), struggled to pull stringy marshmallow leftovers out of his beard. Meghan and Matthew, two of Jean's family's cousins (although distantly and awkwardly related), sat somewhat silently but with huge ear-to-ear grins. Dwight noticed how late it was getting, but he suddenly felt inspired.

        "Before we climb into the tent for bed, everybody has to chug an Amp energy drink," Dwight said. His challenge was gladly accepted by Matt (the bearded fool of whom I harbor so much envy) and Matthew, the younger of the two cousins. The three boys chugged energy drinks and climbed into the tent. It had been a long day, and, energy drinks be damned, they were all very tired. Everyone slipped off to sleep without a moment's hesitation, thinking that perhaps Amp energy drinks weren't so potent after all.

        That is, until about 3:30 in the morning.

        "uuhhhhhHHAAAAAAAAAAAHHHARGH!" Everyone in the tent was violently awoken by a sudden scream.

        "What the hell was that?" Hilary asked, groggily.

        "I think it was your dad," cousin Matthew said.

        There was a moment of silence before Dwight said, "It's okay, everybody. Daddy just had a bad dream. Go back to sleep." More silence.

        Matt (the bearded one) lay on his back, shaking in fear. What could have possibly affected such a manly man so deeply? What could Dwight have to fear? And how was he supposed to sleep now? Sure, he hadn't the dream, which had obviously been terrifying for Dwight. But what's scarier? To have such a dream and to wake up? Or to be so violently awoken by the terror in someone else's voice?

        But who was Matt kidding? That was one of the most hilarious things he'd ever seen. What was really scary was thinking about what Dwight might do to him when he found out how much Matt liked to tell that story to everyone he knew.

      • answered by matthewgallion on 07/11/2010
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